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As pet owners, we always want to ensure our companions are safe from potential dangers. From dangling electric cords to contact voltage, there are various hazards both inside and outside the home that can cause curious pets to get into trouble.

Tips to keep your pet safe year-round

         

 

 

Don’t allow your pet to nap behind electrical appliances, such as computer equipment.

   

Secure all loose electrical cords – dangling pieces are tempting to chew on.

   

Protect your pets from contact voltage.

 

Protecting your pet from Contact Voltage

The best way to avoid contact voltage is to exercise caution while walking. Help your pet avoid and step around electrical equipment, including streetlighting poles, handwells, signage and shelters. Here are some ways to help protect yourself and your pet while out on a walk:

               
If you’re walking on the street, walk as close to the storefront as possible to steer clear of streetlighting equipment including handwells and metal fixtures like signage and shelters. Use a leash that’s made of non-conductive material, preferably nylon. Try to keep your leash as dry as possible
It is important to move a safe distance away from areas of contact voltage. Ensure pedestrians stay clear of the area. Most recipients of electric shock caused by contact voltage are pets.

     
Avoid tying your leash to streetlighting poles or near handwells.

If your animal is incapacitated (and you have a dry, nylon leash) remove your pet from the hazard by using the leash or another non-conductive object.  Do not touch the animal directly as you may also receive an electric shock.

Toronto Hydro is taking all safety precautions to help prevent and limit contact voltage across the city. Learn more about the program by visiting the Contact Voltage page 

Pet Safety Week

To ensure the well-being of our pets, Toronto Hydro and the Toronto Humane Society joined forces to launch the city’s annual Pet Safety Week, which takes place the second last week of October.