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Toronto Hydro CR Report 2016

INTRODUCTION MATERIALITY AND STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT OUR CITY OUR OUR PEOPLE ENVIRONMENT GLOSSARY AT A GLANCE Hazardous waste Hazardous waste management programs are in place to address the handling and disposal of liquid and solid hazardous waste. The programs are designed to ensure compliance with applicable provincial and federal legislation. Employees receive training on how to safely handle hazardous waste. Topics include personal protective equipment, how to store waste, how to transport waste safely, how to complete the appropriate shipping documents, and emergency response. The hazardous waste management program is evaluated through regular audits with the results reported to senior management. Detailed tracking Oil spills containing PCB with a concentration of greater than two ppm are managed following Toronto Hydro’s spill response and reporting procedure. Spill data is tracked and reported to senior management on a monthly basis. The data is used to track performance, effectiveness of controls, and to determine if new or updated mitigation plans are required. Non-hazardous waste Toronto Hydro has implemented a non-hazardous solid waste management program and conducts annual waste audits to develop waste reduction work plans in an effort to reduce the amount of non-hazardous waste that goes to landfill from work centres. In 2015, a strategy to reduce waste was developed based on the findings of the waste audits. This strategy included monthly audits, employee education, increased awareness and employee feedback. A waste diversion target was established at a corporate level in 2016 and progress was reported to the organization on a regular basis. In 2016, 64% of the non-hazardous waste generated at Toronto Hydro was diverted from landfill. Recycling treated wood poles Sections of wood poles have historically been treated with preservation compounds in order to increase the lifespan of the poles. A study conducted in 1989 found that untreated red pine wood poles had a lifespan of approximately 4.5 years, while poles that had been treated had a lifespan of 40 to 48 years. Extending the lifespan of poles is environmentally responsible as it reduces the amount of resources (i.e. trees) required to replace old poles. Treated wood poles, however, complicate the disposal process as they cannot be recycled in the same manner as untreated wood. Rather than sending used treated wood poles to a landfill, Toronto Hydro ships the waste to a company that specializes in the transformation of treated wood. The poles are either reused for construction materials or crushed into wood shavings for use in co-generation applications, cement works and the paper industry, among other uses. OUR ENVIRONMENT I TORONTO HYDRO 81


Toronto Hydro CR Report 2016
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