Page 34

Toronto Hydro CR Report 2016

OUR CITY Brighter NightsTM For the first time in 2016, Toronto Fire Services joined the efforts at two Brighter NightsTM community events, promoting neighbourhood safety, and fire awareness and prevention. Participants replaced nearly 500 old, burnt out or inefficient porch lights with more energy-efficient bulbs, encouraging residents to leave the porch lights on overnight, helping make the community safer. The program is a joint effort with the City of Toronto’s Community Crisis Response Program, Toronto Community Housing, Toronto Police Service and local volunteers. Protecting Toronto’s tree canopy Trees help conserve energy by providing shade and reducing air conditioning demands. They naturally clean the air by absorbing carbon dioxide and help prevent erosion and excess water run-off, protecting electrical equipment. Toronto Hydro is committed to preserving Toronto’s tree canopy as trees help customers manage their electricity bills and collectively reduce the city’s emissions. Toronto Hydro takes extra effort to protect the roots of trees. When constructing new underground plant near trees within the public road allowance, Toronto Hydro uses a construction method called tree tunneling. This construction method allows work under, around and against the trees to be done without harming their roots. A Tree Protection Zone (TPZ) under the drip line of the tree is first established based on the trunk diameter (taken at 1.4 metres above the ground). Larger trees require a larger TPZ. Plywood or plastic web snow fencing is used to designate individual TPZ limits. No root cutting is permitted within the TPZ. Any roots located outside the TPZ that need to be pruned must first be exposed by hand digging or by using a low pressure hydro vacuum method to avoid damaging the root bark. An arborist or tree professional is required to do any large root pruning. Backfill material in tunnels is limited to “boulevard mix,” which ensures that replacement soils are flowable and are able to consolidate under their own weight in order to provide optimum root growth and avoid settlement. Tree tunneling is carried out using vacuum excavation methods that use pressurized water and an industrial strength vacuum to simultaneously excavate and evacuate soil. As hydro excavation safely breaks up soil, the soil and water slurry is conveyed by vacuum to a debris tank. Horizontal tunnels can be safely dug using this method for up to 9 metres in length underground. This procedure is in full accordance with the City of Toronto’s Tree Protection Policy & Specifications for Construction near Trees. Annual Tree Planting Event An annual Tree Planting Event with the non-profit organization, Local Enhancement & Appreciation of Forests (LEAF), was held to engage employees in this important cause. Since 2015, Toronto Hydro employees, along with their friends and families, planted more than 630 trees and shrubs in parks throughout Toronto. Since 2004, nearly 4,000 trees have been planted across the city through this partnership. Safety Around Fallen Hydro Poles Toronto Hydro is committed to the safety and well-being of all city residents. Each year, the company works to help lower the risk of incidents involving electrical infrastructure. In 2016, Toronto Hydro, together with Toronto Fire Services (TFS), held a demonstration event to educate members of the public about how to respond if electrical wires fall on top of a vehicle. A mock collision scene was created using a practice car provided by TFS, along with a hydro pole, complete with wires, which were placed on the hood of the car to provide the effect of a collision. The event demonstrated the proper steps to take in this type of emergency and how to safely evacuate in the event that the downed wires cause a fire. For this initiative, Toronto Hydro won the Electrical Safety Authority’s Powerline Safety award in 2016. 34 TORONTO HYDRO I 2016 CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY REPORT


Toronto Hydro CR Report 2016
To see the actual publication please follow the link above