Page 25

Toronto Hydro CR Report 2016

INTRODUCTION MATERIALITY AND STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT OUR CITY OUR OUR PEOPLE ENVIRONMENT GLOSSARY AT A GLANCE System Maintenance Program Toronto Hydro is responsible for providing reliable service while mitigating environmental, safety and financial risks. A significant system maintenance program is in place to fulfill this responsibility. The program allows for the proactive identification and scheduled correction of deficiencies in distribution equipment before they lead to a failure. This reduces the likelihood of an incident occurring that may impact system reliability, worker or public safety or the environment (e.g. a spill). It also decreases the amount of money and natural resources required to purchase new equipment by ensuring existing equipment is used to its maximum lifespan. Toronto Hydro performs inspections and maintenance activities on all of the Toronto Hydro owned electrical equipment located in substations, underground vaults, on-ground concrete pads, cable chambers, customer building vaults, and overhead lines across Toronto. In 2015 and 2016 combined, Toronto Hydro spent more than $100 million on maintenance and inspection, corrective, and emergency programs. The inspections are a proactive measure used by Toronto Hydro for early identification and resolution of deficiencies. The planned inspections and maintenance tasks are typically conducted on a fixed cycle, which is determined either per the OEB’s Distribution System Code’s Minimum Inspection Requirements or through the Toronto Hydro Reliability Centered Maintenance approach based on the mean time between failures of a given equipment class. Throughout the course of the planned inspection program, minor deficiencies are corrected immediately wherever possible, while deficiencies requiring more involved repairs are identified for follow-up work, which is executed through Corrective Maintenance Programs. Due to the complexity of the system, inspections are performed using various techniques and tools. Through visual inspections, it is possible to identify deteriorating assets that are corroding, leaking, and have loose or broken components. To identify deficiencies that otherwise would not be detectable to the human eye while the equipment is energized, Toronto Hydro makes use of non-contact technologies such as infrared scanning and partial discharge detection. Additionally, advanced predictive technologies such as resistographs for measuring wood pole strength, and dissolved gas analysis for monitoring transformer health are also employed. Along with the inspections, some equipment is maintained after de-energizing for cleaning, lubricating, tuning-up, and repairing or replacing worn out parts. Repairs made on equipment deficiencies prevent or prolong the need for a full asset replacement, which results in improved reliability and cost savings. Moreover, planned replacement of defective equipment limits customer outage duration, environmental hazards, and cost savings from not having to perform emergency repair. Finally, Toronto Hydro also has an Emergency Maintenance program that entails 24/7 response to unplanned and urgent events involving Toronto Hydro’s distribution system assets. Toronto Hydro operates within a dynamic, dense, urban environment where emergency response is required for a wide variety of reasons including, but not limited to, equipment failure, severe weather, power quality issues, motor vehicle accidents, equipment isolations, and requests from Toronto emergency services (i.e. police, fire, and ambulance). The demands on the Emergency Response Program can vary considerably from one year to the next due to the volume and impacts of significant system events and extreme weather. OUR CITY I TORONTO HYDRO 25


Toronto Hydro CR Report 2016
To see the actual publication please follow the link above